Working With Calcaneal Spur

posted on 27 Sep 2015 20:01 by joliehonhart
Calcaneal Spur

Overview

When the body is under stress or constent inflammation it will deposit calcium to our bones. This added 'bone growth' is designed to relieve the added stress/pressure to our connective tissue. In the case of a heel spur, added calcium to the heel bone (calcaneus). It usually forms at the bottom underside of the heel bone where the plantar fascia attaches. This calcium deposit forms over a period of many months. Heel bones can very in shape and size from person to person. An irregular shape heel (calcaneus) can cause the tissue to twist (plantar ligament and Achilles tendon) or a smaller heel bone will put additional stress on tendons and ligaments.

Causes

One of the most common causes for the development of heel spurs is the wearing of shoes that are too tight. That?s why more women suffer from heel spurs more than men. Athletes who tend to stress their feet a lot, people are overweight who have more pressure on their lower extremities and the elderly also tend to suffer more from heel spurs.

Posterior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

The following symptoms are typical of heel spur. Stabbing pain when treading on the area affected. Dull, irregularly occurring pains in the heel area also without exerting pressure (e.g. in a reclining position) Pain when taking the first steps in the morning (after lying or sitting down for an extended period, especially in the morning) Occasional swelling in the ankle area. For the lower heel spur, extreme sensitivity at the tendon attachment (laterally in the lower heel area) For the upper heel spur, extreme pressure sensitivity of the Achilles tendon, primarily at approximately ankle height.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will discuss your medical history and will examine your foot and heel for any deformities and inflammation (swelling, redness, heat, pain). He/she will analyze your flexibility, stability, and gait (the way you walk). Occasionally an x-ray or blood tests (to rule out diseases or infections) may be requested.

Non Surgical Treatment

Rest your foot. Reduce the amount of weight-bearing activities you participate in. Get off of your feet and elevate them. This will allow healing to begin. Apply ice to your foot. Applications of ice packs that provide a comfortable cooling to the heel and arch (not a freezing cold) will help reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation. Apply the ice to the heel and arch (not the toes). Make sure it is comfortable, and leave on your foot for about 20 minutes, 3 times a day. If you have any medical problems such as diabetes, poor circulation, etc., discuss the use of ice with your doctor before applying the ice. Active Wrap allows you to apply comfortable cold therapy to your foot without messy ice cubes. Use while on the ?go.? Do not walk with bare feet. Always protect your heels, arches, and plantar fascia with good supportive shoes. Vionic Orthotic Flip Flops For Men and Women are designed for walking comfort with built in orthotic foot beds that help reduce foot pain from heel spurs. Use in the house or on the beach.

Surgical Treatment

When chronic heel pain fails to respond to conservative treatment, surgical treatment may be necessary. Heel surgery can provide pain relief and restore mobility. The type of procedure used is based on examination and usually consists of releasing the excessive tightness of the plantar fascia, called a plantar fascia release. The procedure may also include removal of heel spurs.